Copy of The Latest SAA Newsletter

GM Economist and Ford Futurist Lead Compelling Lineup of Automotive Outlook Conference Speakers

The 35th Annual Automotive Outlook Conference on January 27, 2022 will be SAA’s first in-person event since the start of the COVID. The SAA flagship event will take place at Marelli’s new headquarters in Southfield, MI.

The event will feature Sheryl Connelly, Ford’s Chief Futurist, and Elaine Buckberg, GM’s Chief Economist. Other speakers include Joe Langley, Associate Director, North American Forecasting at IHS Markit, Kevin Riddell, Senior Manager, Powertrain Forecasts at LMC Automotive, Daron Gifford Partner, Strategy Consulting Service at Plante Moran, and Tyson Jominy, Vice President, Data & Analytics at J.D. Power.

The event will look at what 2022 has in store for OEMs and suppliers and provide updates and forecasts on North American sales dynamics, vehicle production, electrification and autonomous vehicles. Jamie Butters, Executive Editor at Automotive News, will moderate the event.

Click here for more information on the Outlook Conference.

 

Check Out Latest SAA Industry Insights Video

In the latest edition of SAA's Industry Insights, Dave Nemtuda of LexisNexis discusses improving recall completion percentages and performance through enhanced owner intelligence.

Go to www.SAAauto.com to watch the video or click here.

 

U.S. Light Vehicle Sales Decline Eases Slightly in November, But Lean Inventories Continue to Severely Impact the Market’s Selling Rate

The month of November started strong, signaling that the worst impact of lean inventories on sales may be over, but the month ended with the reality that dealers are still struggling to meet demand. Sales ended the month at 1 million Light Vehicles, a 16% YoY decline, according to LMC Automotive. Sales were down by more than 20% in September and October compared with the previous year.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

November Auto Sales Stuck in Low Gear as Consumers and Dealers Face Tight New-Vehicle Inventory and High Prices

When auto sales for November are confirmed by many automakers later this week, the results are forecast by Cox Automotive to show a market still held in check by limited new-vehicle supply and high prices. The November sales pace is expected to be down notably year over year, but should show a slight improvement from October, as select manufacturers have been able to modestly boost inventory and, as a result, sales.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

FTC to Investigate Supply Chain Interruptions

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) voted on November 29 to launch an inquiry into the supply chain disruptions, and as a result, they are ordering nine large retailers, wholesalers, and consumer good suppliers to provide detailed information that will help the FTC shed light on the causes behind ongoing supply chain disruptions and how these disruptions are causing ongoing hardships for consumers and competition in the U.S. economy. It likely will take several months for the FTC to conduct its study so the results of the inquiry will not be known for some time. Manufacturers should be mindful of these types of inquiries as the FTC potentially may expand its probe to include other companies in the supply chain or other industries.

Click here to read Foley’s full article.

If you have any questions regarding the article’s content, please contact Elizabeth Haas at ehaas@foley.com or Richard Flannery at rflannery@foley.com.

 

10 Ways Your Legacy System is Costing You...and What You Can Do About It

Many businesses are still operating on systems that are 15, 20, or 25 years old. And while they may seem to provide adequate functionality day to day, they can constrain growth in ways you might not realize. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software may not generate direct revenue, but relying on a legacy system can cost you in terms of dollars, risk, and performance.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

Chip Shortage Changes Car Industry Fundamentally

The automotive industry faces fundamental changes as the world struggles with a shortage of semiconductors, a senior Daimler executive said. "In the future, vehicle manufacturers will purchase raw materials and key components themselves directly from the respective suppliers and will no longer rely solely on the large suppliers as system providers," Michael Brecht, who heads Daimler's works council, told German press agency dpa.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

Auto Executives Expect EVs Will Own Half of U.S., China Markets by 2030 

Auto industry executives expect electric vehicles will make up just over half of new vehicle sales in the United States and China by 2030, and could do so without receiving government subsidies, according to a new survey by accounting and consulting firm KPMG.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

2021 Tech Summit: Digital Transformation Isn’t an Option, It’s Essential

View Plante Moran’s on-demand sessions from the 2021 Tech Summit, a two-day virtual event that featured panel discussions on issues poised to change the face of the public and commercial industry sectors, such as digital transformation, workforce and talent retention, data transparency, and strategy and operations.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

The Auto Industry is Begging the U.S. Government to Make it Easier to Import Critical Parts from China

Auto suppliers and manufacturers, including Tesla, are urging the US government to waive tariffs on a range of critical components from China, especially those for electric-car batteries.

Click here for the rest of the article.

 

Stellantis CEO: Speeding Up EV Transition is “Beyond the Limits” of What Auto Industry Can Sustain

In an interview at the Reuters Next conference, Stellantis CEO Carlos Tavares said that the costs of speeding up the transition to EVs are “beyond the limits” of what the auto industry can sustain. Tavares was discussing how governments and investors want automakers to speed up the transition to electricity and shared how difficult this was.

Click here for the rest of the article.

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